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Author Topic: .50 Thompson Center Hawken  (Read 4436 times)

mykeal

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.50 Thompson Center Hawken
« on: September 14, 2011, 10:04:21 AM »


Picked this one up at an auction several years ago. This is a special edition with fancy wood and highly polished blued barrel and furniture. Never been fired. Like the CVA, not a lot in common with a true Hawken, but a nice example of a plains style rifle.


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Hawg

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Re: .50 Thompson Center Hawken
« Reply #1 on: September 14, 2011, 11:03:11 AM »

I'd HAVE to shoot it.
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Rowdy

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Re: .50 Thompson Center Hawken
« Reply #2 on: September 17, 2011, 09:59:09 PM »

Mykeal,
I'd like to ask you a big favor...could you take some close up pictures of your T/C rifle and post them or PM them to me please?

I just bought a T/C Hawkins 50 cal kit...it's been sitting for years I guess and I hope all the parts are there. It seems to be complete but the assembly instructions are only a few pages and don't go into a great amount of detail.  It seems they assume you know more about the process than I do and I don't want to mess it up.

I need to see close up pics of how the top piece fits to the wood (the part behind the barrel) and the barrel and ramrod fittings and maybe underneath the trigger.

The kit has the patch box in the stock so it's not the special edition one like you have.  The brass fittings where the barrel pin goes through are not going to fit flush...they will be sitting a little bit high on the stock instead of flush. I would not attempt to try and cut the stock and make them fit flush.

There are no instructions how the side plate and double trigger assembly go together or ...and this one I will need to ask questions about...how to make sure the double set triggers are assembled and adjusted.

I'm going to start by sanding the stock down smooth and then assemble the gun and see where I need to keep working it to make all the parts flush then when all that is done, finish the stock.

If you can do this it would be a big help.

That special edition you have there is a great looking rifle...

Thanks, Rowdy
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Hawg

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Re: .50 Thompson Center Hawken
« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2011, 10:04:24 PM »

If it's like most older kits you're going to have to do some inletting. They were for the most part 95% finished.
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Rowdy

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Re: .50 Thompson Center Hawken
« Reply #4 on: September 18, 2011, 12:37:42 AM »

The only parts I'd like to have inlet'ed are the two oval brass pieces...one on each side of the forearm...and I'm not even going to try it...An oval will have sides going with the grain, across the grain and everything in between and I'd screw it up for sure!   :o   I'm not that good at wood work! :D
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mykeal

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Re: .50 Thompson Center Hawken
« Reply #5 on: September 18, 2011, 04:59:52 AM »

I'd be happy to take any pictures you'd like. It'll take a little while, however, maybe a week or so.

Inletting - the key is not just skill, it's having the right tools and patience, lots of patience. You can deepen those escutcheon inlets with no damage by just taking your time and doing just a little bit at a time. Make sawdust, not big chunks. When it seems too hard, just set it down and go away for a while, take a rest and get back to it later. There's no deadline. As far as tools are concerned, use ONLY very sharp knives, gouges and scrapers. Visit a woodworking tool online shop for ideas. If it were me, I'd go to Brownell's site and get a scraper, and just scrape the bottom of the hole over and over until it's deep enough.
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Hawg

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Re: .50 Thompson Center Hawken
« Reply #6 on: September 18, 2011, 05:07:13 AM »

I bought a single shot pistol kit once. The lock wouldn't even fit the hole. The only thing that was completely inlet was the barrel channel.
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Rowdy

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Re: .50 Thompson Center Hawken
« Reply #7 on: September 18, 2011, 05:19:19 PM »

Thanks mykeal...no hurry. Gee, I bought this T/C kit and see Traditions has them complete at $299...oh well...I think the T/C was made in the USA   :-*
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mykeal

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Re: .50 Thompson Center Hawken
« Reply #8 on: September 18, 2011, 05:48:55 PM »

Yep. T/C is made in USA, Traditions is made in Spain. Still pretty good guns, though.
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mykeal

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Tang fitting
« Reply #9 on: September 19, 2011, 07:05:04 PM »

Different rifle, but same brand and model. The front and back screws are wood screws; the center screw is a metal screw for mounting a tang sight.




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mykeal

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Under the trigger
« Reply #10 on: September 19, 2011, 07:25:38 PM »

Two screws to remove the trigger guard, one to remove the trigger assembly.



The trigger assembly is not connected to the lock. The blades rotate upward against the sear arm and release the sear.
The rear 'set' trigger is pulled first, rotating it into a notch on the blade of the front trigger and 'setting' it against a spring. Pulling the front trigger releases the catch, causing the blade on the set trigger to move the sear arm. The adjustment screw does not affect the load required to release either trigger; it simply adjusts the position of the front trigger blade, changing the amount of travel necessary for the front trigger to release the sear.

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mykeal

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Barrel and ramrod thimbles
« Reply #11 on: September 19, 2011, 07:39:09 PM »

The barrel is a hooked breech design; a hook on the breech end fits into a hole in the tang fitting. The wedge through the forearm is the only thing securing it into the stock. This makes it easy to remove the barrel for cleaning.





The ramrod thimbles are secured by screws into the barrel underrib. The underdrib is screwed into the barrel itself. This should be periodically removed and cleaned to prevent rust on the bottom of the barrel.




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Rowdy

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Re: .50 Thompson Center Hawken
« Reply #12 on: September 20, 2011, 11:55:04 PM »

Mykeal, Thanks for the pictures!!
I have some wood to remove for the tang piece to be flush.  The under rib looks to be steel or polished metal.  Could it be treated/coated??...maybe blued??

These pictures are going to be a huge help. The info too.  I'll be hollar'in again when I get started with this.  I'll be posting pictures too.
Regards, Rowdy
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mykeal

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Re: .50 Thompson Center Hawken
« Reply #13 on: September 21, 2011, 05:33:29 AM »

Two things to mention regarding the trigger & lock:

It is possible to turn the trigger adjustment screw too far, in which case the trigger will not set and the sear can be released without warning. Be sure that you don't overdo turning the screw. It will be obvious if you've gone too far because the set trigger won't work.

The kit guns often don't have enough wood removed in the lock inlet. If that's the case the lock may appear to be inlet correctly (that is, the lock plate surface will be flush with the wood) but the wood inside the inlet interferes with the hammer fall. That can usually be corrected by backing out on the lock screw that holds it in place (the large one that inserts from the left side of the gun). That screw does not have to be tightened down until you can't turn it. However, if it is necessary to leave it loose for the lock to function you will need to remove some wood in the lock inlet. A scraper is a very useful tool in this case. Remove the lock and coat the surfaces of the inside parts that night contact the wood with lipstick, lamp black or some other contrasting agent; reinstall the lock and tighten down the screw, then remove the lock and it should be obvious where to remove the wood. Repeat as necessary.

This forum has a gun builder's section. Post your progress there; we'd all like to see it.
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Rowdy

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Re: .50 Thompson Center Hawken
« Reply #14 on: September 21, 2011, 09:08:58 AM »

Spot on with the lock information.
The lock is very hard to put in place if you try and insert it evenly on each end.  It seems to get it in place, I have to push one end in a bit and then the other end and so on.  It is a very tight fit and I was wondering if it's rubbing or hitting something inside. I will candle smoke the lock inlet and see where it's tight...
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